Fake Wounded Army Veteran, Career Conman Jeremy Wilson Gets Slammed By Judge

 

 

Ross ripped Wilson, 43, for his fake soldier act, calling him “the antithesis of these selfless individuals who put their lives on the line for others.”

The judge was especially irked by Wilson’s “horrific lie regarding having earned two purple hearts.” That, he said, was “abhorrent and despicable.”

 

Jeremy Wilson at his sentencing in May

 

 

 

 

 

Courtesy: NYPost.   New York – A man who pretended to be a US Army veteran so he could lease a BMW and rent a luxury apartment was given a seven to 14-year prison sentence in the Manhattan Supreme Court on May 9th, 2017.

The sentence came after Jeremy Wilson spent 10 minutes telling the court how he didn’t know how to “fix” himself.

“Ive spent pretty much my entire adult life running and hiding from myself, and running and hiding from what I have done,” the scammer said.

“Of all the lies I’ve told other people, it’s the lies I’ve told myself that make living the hardest,” Wilson added, barely containing a smirk as he talked.

 

Jeremy Wilson before being taken away to prison

 

 

“If things as fundamental as my last name can’t get sorted out by investigators who are very good at their job … I don’t know how to sort anything out,” said the 43-year-old, who has repeatedly claimed to be the lovechild of late IRA leader Brian Keenan.

Wilson claimed to be a US Army veteran with two Purple Hearts, and a doctor with two Ph.D.s from MIT. He allegedly stole an MIT corporate credit card from the campus mailroom and forged checks in order to lease a $55,000 BMW X# in Boston. He later used the same fake identity to land a $5,000-a-month apartment in the Financial District.

He strolled into the police station in Chelsea, N. wearing a Harvard sweatshirt, a “Wounded Warrior” cap and military dog tags dangling from his neck. He said he was Jeremiah Asimov-Beckingham, a veteran of Afghanistan, wounded in combat, now working as an executive for an airline. He had come to the station to pick up his car.

His new BMW had been impounded, he believed, as evidence in a random crime. But it was a ploy. The police were hoping to lure a man suspected of forging checks in Cambridge, Mass., to steal $70,000 and the BMW, which they had tracked to a Manhattan garage. They put Mr. Asimov-Beckingham in handcuffs and charged him with larceny.

Investigators soon learned that the man’s name was not Asimov-Beckingham. He had never been wounded in combat, nor had he ever served in the military. New York detectives and Homeland Security agents found an Indiana birth certificate in his immigration file showing his name as Jeremy Wilson, born in Indianapolis in July 1973. It was the oldest document in the file, so they charged him under that name.

Still, his identity was a puzzle. He had spent 25 years stealing Social Security numbers and fabricating new aliases, leaving behind a thicket of confusing and falsified records. Six weeks earlier, he had been released from a federal prison in New Hampshire, where he had served six years for identity theft as Jeremy Clark-Erskine. But he had more than 27 aliases in five states. His birth certificate had been altered several times. Even his citizenship was in doubt.

Items seized from Mr. Wilson’s apartment. He has spent 25 years fabricating new aliases, leaving behind a thicket of confusing and falsified records. Credit N.Y.P.D.

 

 

“Who are we to say what is true and what’s not true?” defense attorney Robert Briere told the court Monday. “Who are we to say what’s happened to him and what’s influenced his life?”

Briere, who has filed motions asking that his client be referred to as “Jeremy Keenan” in court, replaced prominent attorney Edward Hayes — who only agreed to take the case after getting an appeal from the man he believed to be Keenan’s son. Hayes later withdrew, saying he was concerned he was being conned.

Prosecutor Diego Diaz cited Wilson’s complete lack of remorse, saying he has “spent his entire adult life devoted to fraud.”

“He claims to have been in a kibbutz in Israel, to have been shot in the head in Africa,” Diaz asserted. “He continues to perpetuate this fraud.”

The ADA noted that Wilson, who has “at least eight” felony convictions in his past, has been prosecuted for similar stunts across the US, including in Montana, Indiana, Ohio and Pennsylvania.

“Jeremy Wilson posed as an airline executive, an MIT student, an Army veteran, and a member of an actors’ union,” Manhattan DA Cy Vance said in a statement following the sentencing. “Now the only uniform he will be wearing is a prison jumpsuit.”(Thank You Mr. DA)

“I think it may be helpful for me to quote Isaac Asimov,” Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Neil Ross told Wilson — who went by the pseudonym Jeremiah Asimov-Buckinhgam — just before he sentenced him to Seven to Fourteen years in prison.

Ross ripped Wilson, 43, for his fake soldier act, calling him “the antithesis of these selfless individuals who put their lives on the line for others.”

The judge was especially irked by Wilson’s “horrific lie regarding having earned two purple hearts.” That, he said, was “abhorrent and despicable.”

 

“It has been my philosophy of life that difficulties vanish when faced boldly,” the judge said, quoting the science fiction writer. “You spoke earlier about not knowing the solution. Asimov has the solution for you. I urge you, regardless of where you are in the future, to face your challenges boldly.”

“Quite frankly, whatever you’re going to give to me I deserve,” Wilson told the Judge before hearing his fate.

The judge gave him the max.

 

 

Defendant Information:

JEREMY WILSON, D.O.B. 7/5/1973
New York, NY

Convicted:
•    Forgery in the Second Degree, a class D felony, 1 count
•    Criminal Possession of Stolen Property in the Third Degree, a class D felony, 1 count
•    Criminal Possession of a Forged Instrument in the Second Degree, a class D felony, 3 counts
•    Criminal Possession of Stolen Property in the Fourth Degree, a class E felony, 2 counts

Sentenced:
•    7-to-14 years in state prison

 

 

 

 

Support out mission and sip some coffee!! Grounds of Valor

 

What are your thoughts?
Share
© Guardian Of Valor